3 DIY HEALTHY HOMESTEADING PROJECTS

MAKING YOUR OWN PRODUCTS IS FUN AND REWARDING AND PART OF BECOMING MORE SELF SUFFICIENT

DIY – LAVENDER DETOX BATH/FOOT SOAK

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 cup Epsom Salt
  • 10-30 drops Lavender Essential Oil
  • 1 cup Bentonite Clay
  • 1 cup Baking Soda
  • 1 cup Borax
  • 1 cup sea salt optional

DIRECTIONS

  • In a small bowl 
  1. Mix epsom salt with lavender essential oil (or oil of choice)
  • In a large glass bowl or jar
  1. Add 1 cup bentonite clay
  2. Add 1 cup baking soda
  3. Add 1 cup borax
  4. Mix well and add epsom salt mix to the large bowl.  
  5. Store in a sealed container until use.  
  6. Label container with the following instructions. 

USE:

  1. Add 1/2-2 cups to an inch or two of warm water In a bath or foot soak.
  2. Drink a cup or two of clean filtered water.
  3. Get in the water.
  4. Slowly add HOT water until you cannot stand it any longer
  5. Soak for 20 minutes
  6. Rinse off well
  7. Drink plenty of clean filtered water
  • Be sure there is no metal exposed to the water. Use a rubber tub stop or bag in needed. 

 For more information on my healing journey with God, visit yourhealingfoodie.com. pre order your copy of the book HEALTHY HOMESTEADING BASICS: DIY THE HARD GOD’S WAY in pdf or hard copy

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DISCOUNTED QUALITY ESSENTIAL OILS

Local Resources:

  • For more help with detoxing or healing contact Rapha Haus at 208-392-0577
  • For natural products and more contact Red Pill Apothecary 970-401-0435
  • Dr Carrie Madej explains importance of detox helps remove parasites and nanotechnology from the body including detox from vaccines.    https://www.carriemadej.com/videos

Herb Tincture – Folk Method

SUPPLIES NEEDED

  • Dry or fresh quality wildcrafted(foraged) or organically grown herbs (cut and or broken up well)
  • High proof alcohol (anything you have will work in a pinch)
  • Glass jar with a plastic lid if possible, parchment will work between jar and lid.
  • 4-6 weeks in a dark location
  • Dark amber or cobalt glass dropper bottle is preferred
  • Label the jar marked with date and herb and alcohol used

Basic steps

  1. Fill your tincturing container with the correct amount of herbs. Proportions are important here: too little, and you’ll end up with a weak tincture. Too much, and the amount of alcohol added won’t be enough to pull out all the plant goodness from your herbs.

GENERALLY ½ CONTAINER FULL Dried herbs OR ⅓ CONTAINER of fresh herbs

  1. The appropriate alcohol strength and the relative amount of plant material to use will vary based on what you’re tincturing. Here are some basic measurement guidelines:

GENERALLY ¾ OF THE CONTAINER FULL

  1. Dilution (optional) may reduce shelf life

¼ Container liquid distilled water

  1. Place in a cupboard out of direct sunlight and shake often
  2. Strain in 4-6 weeks and put in tincture bottles
  3. Label the bottles

Alcohol Type and Strength

The appropriate alcohol strength for your tincture will depend upon the qualities of the plant material being used. Stronger is not always better!

Tips for matching your alcohol strength to the herb being tinctured:

40% to 50% alcohol by volume (80- to 90-proof vodka)

• “Standard” percentage range for tinctures.

• Good for most dried herbs and fresh herbs that are not super juicy.

• Good for extraction of water-soluble properties.

67.5% to 70% alcohol by volume (half 80-proof vodka and half 190-proof grain alcohol)

• Extracts the most volatile aromatic properties.

• Good for fresh, high-moisture herbs like lemon balm, berries, and aromatic roots.

• The higher alcohol percentage will draw out more of the plant juices.

85% to 95% alcohol by volume (190-proof grain alcohol)

• Good for dissolving gums and resins but not necessary for most plant material.  

• Extracts the aromatics and essential oils bound in a plant that don’t dissipate easily.

• This alcohol strength can produce a tincture that’s not easy to take and will also dehydrate the herbs if used for botanicals beyond gums and resins.

Pure Tallow Soap Recipe

INGREDIENTS NEEDED

30 oz tallow or lard (be sure to weigh on a scale)

4 oz 100% pure lye 

11 oz distilled water

*When making soap, always measure by WEIGHT, not by volume

0.5 oz essential oil if desired

SUPPLIES NEEDED READY TO USE

Eye protection

Gloves 

Dust mask

Crock pot

Silicone or freezer paper lined container or soap box

Stick blender all metal

APPROXIMATED TIME 2-3 HRS

  • Melt the tallow in the crockpot (or a pot over the stove if you’re in a hurry).
  • Once the fat is nearly all melted, put on your safety gear and carefully measure the lye.

In a heat tolerant glass or stainless bowl or jar and in an area with good ventilation (I do this under with my oven fan on), carefully stir the lye into the measured water. ALWAYS add the lye to the water– do NOT add the water to the lye, as it can result in a volcano-like reaction.  

Use gloves, goggles and mask for protection from.

Stir this lye/water mixture until it has dissolved and let it sit for a few minutes. There will be a chemical reaction between the lye and water, and the water will become very hot, so be careful handling the container.  Wait til the solution is clear and cool enough to handle.

Place the melted tallow in the crockpot (if it’s not already there), and slowly stir the lye/water mixture in.

Switch to an immersion blender (trust me, unless you want to stand there stirring for an hour, you’ll use an immersion blender), and proceed to blend the tallow, lye, and water until you reach TRACE.

TRACE is when the mixture turns to a pudding-like consistency and holds its shape when you drip a bit on top.

Now put the lid on the crockpot, set it on LOW, and allow it to cook for 45-60 minutes. It will bubble and froth, which is fine. Just keep an eye on it to make sure it doesn’t attempt to bubble out of the pot. If it attempts an escape, just stir it back down.

Once it has cooked for a while and passes the “zap” test, IT DOESN’T HAVE A ZAP IF SMALL AMOUNT IS TOUCHED TO THE TIP OF TONGUE, pour/scoop it into a mold and COVER WITH a piece of CARDBOARD AND WRAP IN A TOWEL and allow it to set for 12-24 hours.

Remove the solid soap from the mold, cut into bars and set on a wire rack to cure for 4-6 weeks.  Soap will not be usable until then. 

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